Upcoming Events

Feb
29
Thu
2024
‘Responding’ to immigration: from militarisation to martial politics in Africa-EU relations @ Sala Belvedere
Feb 29 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
‘Responding’ to immigration: from militarisation to martial politics in Africa-EU relations @ Sala Belvedere
Join Toni Haastrup who will present on how militarised responses to migration by the EU are not exceptional but rather emblematic of long-standing martial politics, challenging the perception of recent events as unprecedented and urging a re-evaluation of the EU’s global role.
The focus of Toni Haastrup’s intervention is on the practices that are enabled by the EU’s migration regime which is inclusive of policies and institutions. She argues that while it is normal to see the increased use of militarised capabilities for migration control as an escalation or exceptional, brought on by recent events, the EU’s governance of migration by those outside of the Global North has always been characterised by martial politics. She uses the notion of “martial politics” as developed by Alison Howell (2018, 2019) to challenge the notion that recent European responses to immigration, particularly in the aftermath of the so-called migration crisis is exceptional. Rather, I want to suggest ‘Fortress Europe’, for example is constitutive of the European project, and consequently hostility to immigrants has always relied on the martial practices. To engage the EU’s immigration regime through the concept of martial politics is to evaluate “the historical roots and present expressions (Howell, 2018, 121) without bifurcating EU policies before and after the 2015, thus problematising the EU’s role in global politics.
Mar
14
Thu
2024
The global tech order: geopolitical imaginaries and the making of tech regulation @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Mar 14 @ 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
The global tech order: geopolitical imaginaries and the making of tech regulation @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Join Rebecca Adler-Nissen as she delves into the challenges and complexities of digital technology in global politics
There is a growing sense that digital technologies require greater international cooperation and even global regulation. At the same time, rising tension, especially between the US and China, is making such cooperation increasingly difficult. Adding to the complication, these technologies are developed and largely owned by private companies surpassing most states in terms of resources and know-how. While the leaders of these companies often appear unequipped to discuss their own geopolitical role, their ideas matter for international security, global economy, democracy and human rights. The speaker will theorise and explore the emerging global tech order, mapping the contradictory ideologies that these different actors bring to the multi-stakeholder negotiations. Specifically, during the seminar, the geopolitical tech imaginaries – visions of the world supported by digital technologies, will be explored. How do these imaginaries get cultivated within and between tech companies, and how do they shape public discourse, national government positions and the making of tech regulation?