Upcoming Events

Feb
29
Thu
2024
‘Responding’ to immigration: from militarisation to martial politics in Africa-EU relations @ Sala Belvedere
Feb 29 @ 1:30 pm – 2:30 pm
‘Responding’ to immigration: from militarisation to martial politics in Africa-EU relations @ Sala Belvedere
Join Toni Haastrup who will present on how militarised responses to migration by the EU are not exceptional but rather emblematic of long-standing martial politics, challenging the perception of recent events as unprecedented and urging a re-evaluation of the EU’s global role.
The focus of Toni Haastrup’s intervention is on the practices that are enabled by the EU’s migration regime which is inclusive of policies and institutions. She argues that while it is normal to see the increased use of militarised capabilities for migration control as an escalation or exceptional, brought on by recent events, the EU’s governance of migration by those outside of the Global North has always been characterised by martial politics. She uses the notion of “martial politics” as developed by Alison Howell (2018, 2019) to challenge the notion that recent European responses to immigration, particularly in the aftermath of the so-called migration crisis is exceptional. Rather, I want to suggest ‘Fortress Europe’, for example is constitutive of the European project, and consequently hostility to immigrants has always relied on the martial practices. To engage the EU’s immigration regime through the concept of martial politics is to evaluate “the historical roots and present expressions (Howell, 2018, 121) without bifurcating EU policies before and after the 2015, thus problematising the EU’s role in global politics.
Mar
6
Wed
2024
Regime entanglements: mobility, citizenship, and the law @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Mar 6 @ 9:00 am – 1:00 pm
Regime entanglements: mobility, citizenship, and the law @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia

Law has created a close interdependence between citizenship and human mobility. Do states provide equal mobility for all citizens? How do different legal statuses limit or enhance mobility? What is the role of international law? How are citizenship and mobility influenced by a state’s situation, such as crises or economic, political, and social changes? And how can a person’s changing circumstances (dis)enable their mobility? These questions underscore the urgent need for cross-disciplinary research aimed at enhancing our understanding of how citizenship, mobility, and law are structurally intertwined and, ultimately, influence human (im)mobility

This workshop will delve into various aspects of the relationship between law, citizenship, and mobility. What is the role of technology? Who has the privilege to move and under what circumstances, and who is compelled to? What personal and legal resources become available to individuals and families when mobility is facilitated? Bringing together scholars from the Center for Global Mobility Law (University of Copenhagen), the Global Citizenship Observatory (EUI), and the Migration Policy Centre (EUI), this workshop offers a platform for scholars from both domains to share their insights on the interplay between citizenship, global mobility, and law.

REGISTRATION

Post war governance dilemmas and democracy tradeoffs @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Mar 6 @ 2:00 pm – 3:30 pm
Post war governance dilemmas and democracy tradeoffs @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Join Elton Skendaj as he examines the role of international actors in constructing efficient state bureaucracies
This talk will focus on governance dilemmas and stability-democracy trade offs in post war contexts, by looking at processes of transformation in the Western Balkan countries. Using evidence from Kosovo, Serbia, and North Macedonia, Elton Skendaj looks at the role of international actors in building effective state bureaucracies, dilemmas in governing minority-majority relations, and the impact of group security and group status concerns on post war protests in Kosovo.
Mar
14
Thu
2024
The global tech order: geopolitical imaginaries and the making of tech regulation @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Mar 14 @ 1:30 pm – 3:00 pm
The global tech order: geopolitical imaginaries and the making of tech regulation @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Join Rebecca Adler-Nissen as she delves into the challenges and complexities of digital technology in global politics
There is a growing sense that digital technologies require greater international cooperation and even global regulation. At the same time, rising tension, especially between the US and China, is making such cooperation increasingly difficult. Adding to the complication, these technologies are developed and largely owned by private companies surpassing most states in terms of resources and know-how. While the leaders of these companies often appear unequipped to discuss their own geopolitical role, their ideas matter for international security, global economy, democracy and human rights. The speaker will theorise and explore the emerging global tech order, mapping the contradictory ideologies that these different actors bring to the multi-stakeholder negotiations. Specifically, during the seminar, the geopolitical tech imaginaries – visions of the world supported by digital technologies, will be explored. How do these imaginaries get cultivated within and between tech companies, and how do they shape public discourse, national government positions and the making of tech regulation?
Mar
18
Mon
2024
Italy, Europe, the G7 and the China challenge: Lessons from Japan @ Sala Villetta, Villa Schifanoia
Mar 18 @ 9:00 am – 6:00 pm
Italy, Europe, the G7 and the China challenge: Lessons from Japan @ Sala Villetta, Villa Schifanoia
Join the 2024 EU-Asia Annual conference and explore more Japan’s strategic response to China within the Free and Open Indo-Pacific framework, highlighting its lessons for G7 nations on security.

Under the banner of a Free and Open Indo-Pacific, Japan has crafted a grand strategy towards China. Such an approach holds valuable lessons for both the US and Europe, as well as for G7 players more broadly, as demonstrated by the successes of the latest Hiroshima summit. Japan’s encounter with the mix of opportunities and risks posed by a resurgent China early in the 21st century has enabled a learning process in major Western capitals on how to deal with China.

This conference includes major practitioners and assesses the G7 approaches to the China challenge, highlighting Japan’s quiet leadership role, as well as significant differences and best practices in key G7 agenda items: from potential scenarios of security collaboration to synergies across the Taiwan Strait, and economic security broadly defined to include integrative and defensive measures against coercion. The conference concludes by considering a strategic development dossier – possibly high on Italy’s G7 agenda – one that considers the composite needs of the so-called ‘Global South’. This international conference is timely, given Japan’s successful G7 presidency in 2023 and the ‘baton touch’ to Italy in 2024.

In light of these developments, both in the fields of actual political processes and in strategic planning, this conference compares the China agenda, teasing out the complementarities, rift points, and potential convergences. In doing so, the goal is to understand the new concepts and trends as well as explore the tasks ahead in the coming decade.

Programme and registration coming soon.

Mar
26
Tue
2024
Russia in the Balkans – proxies for ‘winning hearts and minds’ @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Mar 26 @ 2:00 pm – 3:00 pm
Russia in the Balkans – proxies for ‘winning hearts and minds’ @ Sala Belvedere, Villa Schifanoia
Join Věra Stojarová as she explores the influence of Russia in the Western Balkans, examining the role of proxy actors and the narratives shaping the region’s political and social landscape.
Russia has long been present in the Western Balkans, raising numerous questions about the country’s strategic goals in the region, and the mechanisms it deploys to achieve them. The lecture focuses on the proxy actors of the Russian Federation, and the channels and narratives they use to transmit Russian messages to the Balkan states. It seeks to unpack their effects at the levels of both state and society, by looking at foreign policy changes and responses by the local population and elites.
Apr
18
Thu
2024
Citizenship and the democratic pendulum in post-communist Europe @ Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia
Apr 18 @ 12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Citizenship and the democratic pendulum in post-communist Europe @ Sala Triaria, Villa Schifanoia
Join Eleanor Knott exploring the evolving nature of citizenship in post-Communist Europe
Scholarship has long examined the construction of membership in democratic societies, often associating open and expansive citizenship with democracy, inclusion, and pluralism. This paper delves into the less-explored trajectories of citizenship policies in post-Communist Europe, amidst expanding illiberalism and democratic decline. How do citizenship policies respond to democratisation or democratic decline? Do they, and if so when, become more inclusive or more restrictive? Using an original dataset (1990-2021), first, the paper categorises citizenship acquisition and loss into four types: desired insiders, desired outsiders, undesired insiders, and undesired outsiders. Second, it observes limited change to citizenship regimes overall. Third, it finds that during democratisation citizenship regimes may, in fact, become more exclusionary. Conversely, the papers finds some evidence that citizenship regimes become more inclusionary during periods of democratic decline. The findings reveal the resilience of citizenship regimes to democratic change in either direction, on the one hand, and their change in unexpected and counterintuitive ways, on the other hand.