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Vivian Gerrand

 

Max Weber Fellow in the Global Governance Programme

Email: Vivian.Gerrand@eui.eu

Tel. +39 055 4685 877

 

 

Biographical note

Vivian Gerrand is a Max Weber Fellow in the Global Governance Programme, Robert Schuman Centre for Advanced Studies, where she also holds an Australian Endeavour Award. Her interdisciplinary scholarship focuses on migrant displacement, belonging, mobility, image-making and representation through a comparative cultural studies lens. Vivian was awarded her PhD at the University of Melbourne in 2013. She is a Visiting Fellow at the Alfred Deakin Centre for Citizenship and Globalisation, Deakin University. Her current work builds on her long term research with Somalis living in the diaspora and pursues two further areas of inquiry: re-imagined citizenship and building resilience to violent extremism. Vivian’s work has appeared in academic journals and in general audience scholarly publications such as Arena MagazineThe Conversation, and Overland. In 2016, Vivian published her first book, Possible Spaces of Somali Belonging, with Melbourne University Press.

Research project

‘The role of image-making in the prevention of violent extremism.’

With the understanding that image-making practices can articulate and contribute to minority belonging, this project seeks to determine the extent to which they might provide counter-narratives to violent extremism. This project investigates how image-making practices may help prevent the global problem of radicalisation that leads to violent extremism. It explores the image-making practices of Somali youth, who are among the most marginalised of Muslim migrant minorities living in western nations, and who are, as heavy users of social networking sites, both vulnerable and resistant to radicalising influences. Qualitative mixed method research, including multi-modal analysis of digital image-making, and interviews with participants in Italy and the United Kingdom are adopted in this study to explore how image-making can enable resilience to violent extremist influences.