logo-eui RSCAS
  • Home
  • MOOCs offered by the Global Governance Programme

MOOCs offered by the Global Governance Programme

MOOC is an acronym that stands for “Massive Open Online Course”. It is a university course offered online and available for free to everyone who has access to the Internet. In offering its course, the Global Governance Programme is working in partnership with Iversity.org, a German company supporting international scholars that want to provide thousands of students around the world with an interactive learning experience. Iversity offers online platform customized and designed specifically for online teaching, the use of multimedia formats and easy interaction online between students and instructors. To find out more about how MOOCs work, watch the video ‘What is a MOOC?’ and visit Q&A page on the Iversity website. 

 

Cultures and Identities in Europe - Past, Present and Future

By Anna Triandafyllidou, Sabrina Marchetti and Hara Kouki

What are the cultures and identities of Europe today? Which are the elements of this unique blend? How do institutions and policies intervene in this field? What is the role of cultural industries in Europe? This Massive Open Online Course (MOOC) provides answers to these questions by looking at the past, present and future of Europe.

START DATE: 28 June 2016
END DATE: 28 February 2017
WATCH THE TRAILER

This MOOC questions what is ‘European identity’ and what we understand and promote as European culture. It explains fundamental European policies on culture, creativity and the media, with a specific focus on urban settings. The course critically explores the formation of diverse identities and cultures in Europe, by shedding light on the importance of past memories and shared heritages in this process. Finally, it illustrates the policy dimension behind European cultural and media industries and questions dominant economistic approaches to cultural creativity.

WHO IS THIS COURSE FOR?

This course is meant as a general introduction to the issue of ‘European identity and culture’ for students and pratictioners in the field of arts, culture and heritage. The core of the course will resemble a BA level course, yet extra materials will be provided to students who want more in-depth information on theories and case-studies.

WHAT DO YOU NEED TO KNOW?

Knowledge of English is essential. Previous knowledge of basic sociological or economic debates on art, diversity and culture can be an advantage, although it is not a compulsory prerequisite.

WHAT WILL YOU LEARN?

Students who take the course will acquire knowledge on:

  • Current debates on what is the ‘European identity’ and what is ‘European culture’ and what it means to talk of them in the singular or in the plural (cultures, identities).
  • Relevant terms and understand the relationship between notions of identity, memory, heritage, and culture.
  • Main approaches to cultural heritage and the public use of history.
  • European policies in the media and cultural sector.
  • Critical approaches to cultural industries: what are they? And why urban settings are so important for their development?

 

COURSE STRUCTURE

CHAPTER 1 – WELCOME

Unit 1.1 – Welcome and instructions
Unit 1.2 – Where are you from?

CHAPTER 2 – WHAT IS EUROPE?

Unit 2.1 – Is there a European identity?
(Interview with Anna Triandafyllidou)
Unit 2.2 – What is ‘European culture’?
Unit 2.3 – Europe seen from the outside
Unit 2.4 – Art challenging what Europe is about.
(Interview with Ulrike H. Meinhof)

CHAPTER 3 – DIVERSITY IN EUROPE

Unit 3.1 – European identity and national identities
Unit 3.2 – Diversity policies in EU institutions: intercultural cities.
(Interview with Irena Guidikova)
Unit 3.3 – ’Unity in diversity’: really?
Unit 3.4 – Cosmopolitanism in Europe and the Venice Biennale.
(Interview with Monica Sassatelli)

CHAPTER 4 – THE ROLE OF MEMORY AND HERITAGE

Unit 4.1 – Cultural heritage and memory in Europe
Unit 4.2 – Memory vs. history: the role of Museums. (Interview with Dominique Poulot)
Unit 4.3 – Contested cultural heritages: the case of Holocaust. (Interview with Jasper Chalcraft)
Unit 4.4 – A transnational cultural heritage: the case of UNESCO. (Interview with Gerard Delanty)

CHAPTER 5 – CULTURAL INDUSTRIES IN EUROPE

Unit 5.1 – What are cultural industries?
Unit 5.2 – Culture, creativity and urban spaces
Unit 5.3 – Culture in urban spaces, today
(Interview with Arturo Rodríguez Morató)
Unit 5.4 – Pluralism in European media information
(Interview with Pier Luigi Parcu)

CHAPTER 6 – CULTURAL CREATIVITY AND EUROPEAN FUTURES

Unit 6.1 – ’European culture’ as a brand
Unit 6.2 – Beyond cultural creativity as innovation
(Interview with Matías Zarlenga)
Unit 6.3 –  The EU ’Creative Europe’ program: what’s next?
(Interview with Philip Schlesinger)
Unit 6.4 – Visions of Europe: media activism

Why Do People Migrate? Part 1: Facts

Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou and Dr. Sabrina Marchetti

This course provides a general introduction to the conditions of refugees, asylum seekers and irregular migrants worldwide (data, regions, etc.) and an overview of the terminology used. It then analyses specific cases in the most relevant geographical contexts, including the asylum seekers arriving in Europe through the Mediterranean, the undocumented Mexican migrants crossing the US border, the Syrian refugees in Turkey and the Rohingya in Australia. In discussing these cases, we will explore the dilemmas behind humanitarian protection and irregular migration for labour purposes.

The course is based on video-lectures, didactic videos and podcast interviews with international experts. Assignments at home consist of short quizzes for each Unit and a journal exercise at the end of the course. Suggestions for further reading will be included in order to achieve a more in-depth understanding.

At the end of the course you will …

  • identify the fundamental terminology and concepts used to discuss irregular migrants and asylum seekers;
  • describe key case-studies of irregular migration and asylum seeking in the world;
  • discuss possible future scenarios and the social challenges posed by these migrations.

REGISTRATIONS OPEN

12 January 2016
ENROL NOW!

COURSE STARTS

1 March 2016

Why Do People Migrate? Part 2: Theories

Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou and Dr. Sabrina Marchetti

The course approaches migration as a constant phenomenon in human history and examines its main supporting theories. It illustrates theories on people’s individual decisions to migrate and also the factors of migration as a structural feature of our societies. It explains the role of social networks and institutions in making people move to another country, or return to their own. Finally, it includes interviews with international experts that describe how migration theories can help to understand some topical case-studies of labour migrations in the world.

The course is based on video-lectures, didactic videos and podcast interviews with international experts. Assignments at home consist of short quizzes for each Unit and a journal exercise at the end of the course. Suggestions for further reading will be included in order to achieve a more in-depth understanding.

At the end of the course you will …

  • identify the fundamental terminology used in theoretical debates on migration;
  • illustrate the main theoretical approaches that explain the motivations for people to move and settle outside their home countries;
  • apply main theories to the interpretation of real case-studies.

REGISTRATIONS OPEN

12 January 2016
ENROL NOW!

COURSE STARTS

1 March 2016

The European Union in Global Governance

Prof. Marise Cremona, Prof. Dr. Christoph Herrmann, Dr. Sabrina Marchetti, Dr. Joris Larik, Kolja Raube, Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou and Prof. Dr. Jan Wouters,

The study of the EU as an international actor has become a key element in European and International Law, European Studies and International Relations. The EU represents the world’s largest trade power and aid donor, has a diplomatic service larger than that of most states, and has launched more than 20 civil-military operations. It has presented itself as a normative, global actor, and its emergence as a legal entity that is neither a state nor a classic international organization has both puzzled and fascinated legal scholars and political scientists alike. We represent a consortium consisting of the Global Governance Programme of the European University Institute in Florence, the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies and the Chair for European and International Economic Law at the University of Passau. We have joined forces guided by the vision of providing cutting-edge expertise on the many facets of this fast-evolving topic to the greatest number of students.

At the end of the course you will …

  • be able to identify and understand the main challenges of the EU and its Member States in the world today, and how they affect us personally
  • understand the means which the EU has at its disposal to tackle these challenges,  and learn ways to critically evaluate its performance.
  • understand and be able to apply the key legal principles and political realities governing EU external relations, its relationship with its Member States and citizens, and the outside world.
  • situate the EU as an international actor into the main theoretical approaches to International Relations, and harness these approaches to analyse current topics in global politics.

Consortium

11081104_1583558848569534_6686507298334101978_n
logo-iversity-193d16b1922b990dc9b541bc0af00588

 

Course instructors 

Dr. Sabrina Marchetti

Dr. Sabrina Marchetti

Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou

Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou