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MOOCs offered by the Cultural Pluralism Research Area

MOOC is an acronym that stands for ‘Massive Open Online Course’. It is a university course offered online and available for free to everyone who has access to the Internet.

In 2017 the Cultural Pluralism Area of the Global Governance Programme launched four MOOCs: ‘Cultures and Identities in Europe‘, ‘Why Do People Migrate? – Part 1 and Part 2, and the ‘Cultural Heritage and the City‘, in partnership with Future Learn, the Social Learning Platform launched by the Open University UK in 2012.

 

 

Cultural Heritage and the City

By Anna Triandafyllidou and Jérémie Molho

Cultural heritage is usually discussed in national or religious terms: we speak of Italian culture, Greek civilization, Islamic art, and so on. But today cities are creating their own heritage through museums, galleries, markets of artistic goods, and urban networks. Cities project themselves as cultural hubs representing and connecting entire regions, for example Doha and the UAE, Singapore and Southeast Asia, Los Angeles and North America.

Using these and other examples, through this course you’ll explore exactly what is meant by urban cultural heritage and key concepts related to it.

Using these and other examples, through this course you’ll explore exactly what is meant by urban cultural heritage and key concepts related to it.

What will you achieve?

By the end of the course, you’ll be able to…

  • Explain what is cultural heritage, its different types and how it has emerged as an area of public policy
  • Identify the key actors of cultural heritage governance
  • Evaluate the impacts of cultural heritage projects on cities
  • Explain the tensions between urban development and cultural heritage
  • Compare the governance of heritage in different cities or countries
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Cultures and Identities in Europe - Past, Present and Future

By Anna Triandafyllidou and Jérémie Molho

What is European identity? What do we understand and promote as European culture? On this course you will answer these questions and others as you critically consider the formation of diverse identities and cultures in Europe. You will explore fundamental European policies on culture, creativity and the media, and shed light on the importance of memories and shared heritage. You will also look at the policy behind European cultural and media industries and question current approaches to cultural creativity that rely heavily on economics.

By the end of the course, you’ll be able to…

  • Engage with current debates on what is ‘European identity’, what is ‘European culture’, and what it means to talk of them in the singular or the plural (cultures, identities).

  • Explain the relationship between notions of identity, memory, heritage, and culture.
  • Interpret main approaches to cultural heritage and the public use of history.
  • Identify European policies in the media and cultural sector.
  • Discuss critical approaches to cultural industries
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Why Do People Migrate? Part 1: Facts

By Anna Triandafyllidou and Nick Dines

Migration often makes headlines; it’s become a key issue of politicians worldwide. But what is the reality of migration? This course will introduce you to key challenges of irregular migration and asylum seeking worldwide. You’ll look at key cases from around the globe, including asylum seekers arriving in Europe via the Mediterranean and Syrian refugees in Turkey, Central American labour migration to the USA and the Rohingya refugee challenge in Southeast Asia.

By the end of the course, you’ll be able to…

  • Identify main terms and concepts used to discuss irregular migration and asylum
  • Discuss key case studies from different world regions
  • Explore future scenarios of international migration
  • Assess the challenges that international migration poses for different countries
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Why Do People Migrate? Part 2: Theories

By Anna Triandafyllidou and Nick Dines

In the second course, you will learn about different theoretical models that seek to explain why migration starts and why it continues. You will explore migration as a structural feature of our societies and examine individual’s choices to migrate. You will consider the role networks and institutions play in the movement of people. You will also hear from international experts about how migration theories can help us understand cases of labour migration in different world regions.

by the end of the course you’ll able to…

  • Identify the fundamental terminology used in theoretical debates on migration
  • Explore the main theoretical approaches
  • Explain the motivations for people to move and settle outside their home countries
  • Apply main theories to the interpretation of real case-studies
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The European Union in Global Governance

Prof. Marise Cremona, Prof. Dr. Christoph Herrmann, Dr. Sabrina Marchetti, Dr. Joris Larik, Kolja Raube, Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou and Prof. Dr. Jan Wouters

The study of the EU as an international actor has become a key element in European and International Law, European Studies and International Relations. The EU represents the world’s largest trade power and aid donor, has a diplomatic service larger than that of most states, and has launched more than 20 civil-military operations. It has presented itself as a normative, global actor, and its emergence as a legal entity that is neither a state nor a classic international organization has both puzzled and fascinated legal scholars and political scientists alike. We represent a consortium consisting of the Global Governance Programme of the European University Institute in Florence, the Leuven Centre for Global Governance Studies and the Chair for European and International Economic Law at the University of Passau. We have joined forces guided by the vision of providing cutting-edge expertise on the many facets of this fast-evolving topic to the greatest number of students

At the end of the course you will…

  • be able to identify and understand the main challenges of the EU and its Member States in the world today, and how they affect us personally
  • understand the means which the EU has at its disposal to tackle these challenges,  and learn ways to critically evaluate its performance
  • understand and be able to apply the key legal principles and political realities governing EU external relations, its relationship with its Member States and citizens, and the outside world
  • situate the EU as an international actor into the main theoretical approaches to International Relations, and harness these approaches to analyse current topics in global politics.

 

Course instructors 

Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou

Prof. Anna Triandafyllidou

Jérémie Molho

Jérémie Molho

Nick Dines

Nick Dines